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Posts Tagged ‘euan semple’

F-2-F? on-line? print?

I never obsess too much about the media, as I think the message and the audience are the primary concern and the most appropriate medium follows. But channels are not mutually exclusive – they all work better as an integrated package.

But what’s your preference?

Prefer on-line?
We held our first webinar yesterday debating “on-line versus print” It was well received. You can view it here http://t.co/RpzA2Ltn You can continue the discussion here http://linkd.in/tQyIvw Thanks to PRAcademy

Prefer print? You can view the chat transcript here Print v On-line IC Webinar Nov 2011 Chat Transcript Thanks to all who took part, especially ex-BBC Gurus Euan Semple & Andrew Harvey and Chair Phil Turner

Prefer F-2-F? Our annual conference on 5th October was a huge success. We produced a printed newspaper to accompany the event, which you can download here Turbulent Times Thanks to InterMedia

Enjoy.

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Call me old-fashioned, but the news of the end Ariel, the weekly BBC staff newspaper, has left me feeling a bit sad.

This Guardian Article gets a bit nostalgic about the journal which was first published in 1936; reflecting on content that has provided great diary pieces, and acknowledging former editor Andrew Harvey for bringing a journalistic hard edge to the publication over the past decade.

It should make for great discussion at our first Inside webinar on 9 November at 1pm when Euan Semple, former BBC Director of KM and creator of talk.gateway and Andrew Harvey, former editor of Ariel will be considering the rise and rise of online channels and the role for print in internal communications moving forwards.
Places are limited – book your place here http://www.eventbrite.com/event/1486378799

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Wikileaks debate

Great turnout at the London Communications and Engagement Group discussion last night.

Leading the discussion were

Euan Semple, Social Media expert (http://bit.ly/fTtXAT)

Dr Dannie Jost, Resident philosopher, World Trade Institute (http://bit.ly/dIGTr9)

and LCEG organiser Matt O’Neill  (http://www.eventextra.net) (http://www.modcommslimited.com)

It prompted interesting thoughts around the impact of wikileaks on corporate comms.

My take on the night was concerned with potential unintended consequences:-

  • the call for opennes and transparency will lead to more secrecy (remember the FOI Act?)
  • transfering control of information from one media to another (and the new media is unregulated!)
  • the potential for manipulation (political control, share prices).

My final reflection is that although most of the conversation last night was around new media and technology, I’m not sure it’s relevant. I suspect that I am part of a majority who consumed the Wikileaks information through traditional media, I haven’t even viewed the site!  Ironically, the “whistleblowers” didn’t even use the site to upload their their dossiers – they handed them over on discs and memory sticks and hard documents – so they didn’t even use the Wiki. I suspect whistleblowers fear they are more likely to be traced if they upload their information onto a site.

It seems to me that the Wikileaks phenonmena is a situation where the custodians of the media and the sources of the information are making decisions on what information to share and use sensationalism to get interest.  They present themselves as the ‘voice of the people’, claiming to represent public interest, without really understanding who the public are, never mind their interests.  Arguably pursuing their own personal and political agendas without regard to the wider consequences like national security and economy.

So what has changed? Not a  lot, it’s just got less regulated.

Heaven forbid, there may be a WikiMurdoch just around the corner.

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